Posted by: poofergirlsperspective | June 19, 2009

Gift of re-seeding?

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Last year for my birthday I got a bunch of annuals to plant in my flower beds.  They didn’t do very well because we had little rain and I did little watering for them. 

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This year, we have flowers where the annuals were last year …

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… lots of flowers.

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Unsure of whether they are annuals that have re-seeded or they actually were perennials we are just accepting them because they are so very pretty. 

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I also have a bunch of daisy’s? … I know that those weren’t planted.  Huh? 

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I just love flowers and I love taking pictures of them … so I’ll take the gift. 

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If you happen to know what type of flower these are, let me know would ya?

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Responses

  1. I believe they are phlox. They are sure pretty! I hope they come up every year now.

  2. OK, now they don’t look like phlox, because I think they grow in ‘flocks’ of flowers…:) not singly.

  3. They are dianthus. I am not sure how it’s spelled, but that is definitely what they are. There are two types–one is an annual, one is a perennial. We did the same thing–thought we planted the annual and it was the perennial–and they’ve been back every year for at least five years. Ours are blooming right now, too. When they all die off, you can cut them back and they will bloom again in late August.

    Many daisies are also perennials, but mine are fussy. Some years they do not bloom, though the green stems are there. It depends on the sunshine/rain, I suppose.

    • Thanks for the info Daine … I had no idea that you were so “flower savy”. :) We have daisy’s in other areas of the yard but not by the steps so those will always be a mystery I guess.

  4. Dianthus is what popped into my mind, also. My mother-in-law always called them “pinks.” Sweet William is yet another name. I had to look it up…
    “The origin of the flower name ‘pink’ may come from the frilled edge of the flowers: the verb “pink” dates from the 14th century and means “to decorate with a perforated or punched pattern”” Someone took pinking shears to them!
    More than you ever wanted to know? Ha


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